Changing Your Windows Password from a Remote Desktop

Password changes from remote desktops need not involve a ritual goat sacrifice.

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I use a Apple MacBook Pro for work and do most of my client work using Microsoft Remote Desktop, either natively on my Mac or via a VMware Fusion VM running Windows 7. It works great, other than you have to remember that Remote Desktop keyboard shortcuts are slightly different than regular ones. And of course the Mac keyboard adds its own spin to shortcuts. Probably the most challenging thing I have to do is periodically change my password on customer systems. After a bit of research I discovered that changing passwords is easier if you use the Microsoft Windows on-screen keyboard.

To launch the on-screen keyboard in Windows Server, go to Start -> Run and type osk into the dialog box.

Remote Desktop Password Reset 01

The on-screen keyboard will appear on the Remote Desktop.

Remote Desktop Password Reset 02-400When the on-screen keyboard appears, press <CTRL> and <ALT> (illustrated as steps 1 & 2) from your physical keyboard. For a Mac keyboard, use <OPTION> for the <ALT> key. While holding down the physical <CTRL> and <ALT> keys, click the <DELETE> key using the on-screen keyboard (illustrated as step 3).

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The standard Windows lock screen will appear. Choose Change a passwordand change password according to your organization’s security policies.

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Mission accomplished, whether on a Mac or a PC. Thanks to Bill Schultz for explaining how to do this procedure on Microsoft TechNet.

What kinds of tricks do you use with Microsoft Windows and Remote Desktop?

Author: Dallas Marks

I am a business intelligence architect, author, and trainer. I help organizations harness the power of analytics, primarily with SAP BusinessObjects products. An active blogger, SAP Mentor and co-author of the SAP Press book SAP BusinessObjects Web Intelligence: The Comprehensive Guide, I prefer piano keyboards over computer keyboards when not blogging or tweeting about business intelligence.

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