SAP BusinessObjects Support for Windows 10

Microsoft Windows 10 arrives this week, with SAP BI support not too far behind.

Wednesday, July 29, 2015 is going to be a big day for Microsoft as it formally releases its latest update to its flagship Windows operating system, Windows 10. Since Windows 7 was released nearly 7 years ago on October 22, 2009, most Enterprises have viewed Windows 8 (released October 26, 2012) or Windows 8.1 (released October 17, 2013) more like Vista 2.0 rather than a worthy successor to Windows 7.

Time will tell if Windows 10 features will prompt enterprises to give up on Windows 7 or hang on until its extended support ends on January 14, 2020. Of great interest to SAP customers will be the new Microsoft Edge browser and how it supports plug-ins like Adobe Flash and Oracle Java.

Jayne Landry, SAP General Vice President and General Manager for Business Intelligence, indicates via Twitter that Windows 10 support will be added first to SAP BusinessObjects BI 4.1 SP7 then folded into BI 4.2 later.

Microsoft Windows 10 Support

last updated March 1, 2017

SAP BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.1 is unsupported on Microsoft Windows 10. Although Priority One Support for SAP BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.1 has been extended to 12/31/2018, it has been out of Mainstream Maintenance support (no more patches) since 12/15/2015.

SAP BusinessObjects BI 4.0 is unsupported on Microsoft Windows 10.

SAP BusinessObjects BI 4.1 SP7 and higher support Microsoft Windows 10.

SAP BusinessObjects BI 4.2 has Windows 10 support from its initial GA to the current release.

What are your organization’s plans for Microsoft Windows 10?

SAP BusinessObjects 4.1 Running on Windows 10 Technical Preview

SAP isn’t ready for Microsoft Windows 10 but its customers already are.

On Tuesday, Microsoft provided the media with a first look at the next version of its Windows operating system, Windows 10. Windows 10 is currently available as a technical preview for those courageous enough to play with unfinished software. Steph Cowan from IT Performs in Midlands, UK was able to quickly get SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence 4.1 SP4 running on the technical preview.

Of course, you won’t find Microsoft Windows 10 on the Supported Platforms/Platform Availability Matrix (PAM) just yet. And no doubt there are issues with any software running on such an early preview OS.

Microsoft has had a painful journey with its current version of Windows, version 8.1. And so have I (see related articles, First Impressions of Microsoft Windows 8 and SAP BusinessObjects Support for Windows 8.1). But addressing the concerns of enterprise IT, which hasn’t deviated from rolling out Windows 7, has clearly been the number one priority for Microsoft. That, and the Microsoft Hair Guy seems to be giving the Apple Scarf Guy a run for his money.

 

While neither have specific delivery dates other than “sometime in 2015”, I’m confident we’ll see SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence 4.2 running on Microsoft Windows 10 next year.

What are your first impressions of Microsoft Windows 10?

SAP BusinessObjects Support for Windows 8.1

Will Windows 8.1 charms finally charm the enterprise?

At Microsoft TechEd this week, Microsoft officially announced that the next version of Windows, codenamed Blue, will be a “free” upgrade named Windows 8.1. A summary of what’s new can be found on their web site (see Microsoft article, What’s New in Windows 8.1). Faced with anemic response from corporate IT over Windows 8 and its controversial new interface (see related article, First Impressions of Microsoft Windows 8), Microsoft is pushing hard that Windows 8.1 is ready for business (see Microsoft article, Modern Business in Mind: Windows 8.1 at TechEd).

While Windows 8.1 does have some compelling features missing from Windows 8, it is unclear that restoring the missing Start button will stimulate enterprise adoption of Windows 8 by organizations that are content with Microsoft Windows 7. I remain skeptical and assume that assigning the “Windows 8.1” brand to Windows Blue is Microsoft’s subtle way of acknowledging that enterprise customers may not be satisfied until Microsoft delivers “Windows 9” in 2014 Windows 10 in 2015.

SAP BusinessObjects customers should note that Windows 8.1 will ship with Internet Explorer 11 (IE11):

Internet Explorer 11 improvements include faster page load times, side-by-side browsing of your sites, enhanced pinned site notifications, and app settings like favorites, tabs and settings sync across all your Windows 8.1 PCs. Internet Explorer 11 now includes capability that enables an anti-malware solution to scan the input for a binary extension before it’s passed onto the extension for execution.

From What’s New in Windows 8.1

Billed as the “first browser for touch” (a claim that is clearly news to iPad users), Microsoft so far has only committed to delivering IE 11 to Windows 8.1 (see Computerworld article, IE11 on Windows 7? Mum’s the word from Microsoft).  Its predecessor, Internet Explorer 10, debuted on Windows 8 but was shortly added to Windows 7 as a critical upgrade to encourage adoption.

After heavy criticism of its slow embrace of Internet Explorer 9 (see related ASUG News article, Waiting on SAP, User Communities Fix SAP BusinessObjects Browser Woes), SAP has swiftly delivered Microsoft Internet Explorer 10 compatibility for the latest service packs of SAP BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.1, SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence 4.0, and even SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence 4.1 which was released to customers— and into ramp-up— last month (see related article, SAP BusinessObjects Support for Windows 8).

But if I’m wrong and corporate IT is ready to receive Microsoft Windows 8.1 with open arms, I hope that SAP will include Windows 8.1 and Internet Explorer 11 in its regression testing for SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence 4.1 Support Pack 2, which is likely to be the version that goes into general availability (GA) around the time that Windows 8.1 debuts to the public.

Download the Product Availability Matrix (PAM)

UPDATE (10/03/2014): Updated with Windows 10, the version of Windows that will follow Windows 8.1.

UPDATE (09/04/2014): Added link to Microsoft Windows lifecycle fact sheet.

UPDATE (03/30/2014): SAP BusinessObjects BI 4.0 SP9 adds support for Windows 8.1,Windows Server 2012 R2, and Microsoft Internet Explorer 11 (see related article, Microsoft Internet Explorer 11)

UPDATE (11/24/2013): BI 4.1 SP2 does include Windows 8.1 support but does not support Internet Explorer 11 (IE11). Windows 8.1 users (are there any out there?) should use supported versions of Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox instead of IE11. 

 

Is your organization adopting Microsoft Windows 8, waiting for Windows 8.1, or waiting even longer for Windows 10?

SAP BusinessObjects Support for Windows 8

Curious about SAP BusinessObjects support for Microsoft Windows 8?

Curious about Microsoft Windows 8 support for SAP BusinessObjects? SAP has released updates to SAP BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.1 and SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence 4.0 that provide support. And you can expect SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence 4.1 to support Windows 8 when it is released later this year.

After spending some time with Windows 8 (see related article First Impressions of Microsoft Windows 8), I doubt that many organizations are looking to adopt it. They still have their hands full replacing aging Windows XP desktops with Windows 7. Windows 7 was a breath of fresh air after Windows Vista failed to capture the hearts and minds of CIOs (see related article SAP BusinessObjects Support for Windows 7).

My hunch is that SAP BusinessObjects administrators will be asked to support Microsoft Internet Explorer 10 (IE10)- already on Windows 8 and recently released for Windows 7- before they are asked to support Windows 8 desktops. Or perhaps Microsoft Office 2013, which started shipping today. SAP BusinessObjects customers waited a long time for Internet Explorer 9 support (see ASUG News article Waiting on SAP, User Communities Fix SAP BusinessObjects Browser Woes). So I hope to see SAP add Microsoft IE 10, Office 2013 and Windows 8 to the supported platforms for BI 4.1.

I’ll be curious to learn how Windows 8 support is defined by SAP.  Will support only cover existing desktop applications like Crystal Reports and Web Intelligence Rich Client? Will legacy applications like Universe Design Tool and Business View Manager not get the Windows 8 investment? Will SAP introduce a touch-enabled Mobile BI app for Windows 8 that complements its iOS and Android offerings? And what are SAP’s plans for Windows RT?

Tomorrow, ASUG kicks off a series of BI 4.1 webcasts where SAP’s Ty Miller will peel back the curtain on the SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence 4.1 roadmap. I’m registered and hope that you are too.

SAP BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.1

Released on February 14, 2013, SAP BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.1 Service Pack 6 has support for:

  • Microsoft Windows 8 for 32-bit desktop tools
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 10 (although compatibility view display mode is required to render some pages accurately)
  • Microsoft Office 2013
  • Microsoft Windows 2012 for server platform
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2012 (as both data source and CMS/Audit DB, but not for Voyager)
  • Microsoft Active Directory 2012
  • Apache Tomcat 7, which is now the default web application server

SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence 4.0

Microsoft Windows 8 support has been added to Support Pack 6, which was released on April 30, 2013.  Read more in an article I wrote for the EVtechnologies blog, SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence 4.0 SP6). Support for Microsoft technologies includes:

  • Microsoft Windows 8 for 32-bit desktop tools
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 10 (for Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows Server 2008)
  • Microsoft Office 2013
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2012 (as both data source and CMS/Audit DB)

SAP BusinessObjects Business Intelligence 4.1

SAP BusinessObjects BI 4.1 RTC went into ramp-up on May 10, 2013 and is expected to be generally available (GA) in Q3 2013. Support for Microsoft technologies includes:

  • Microsoft Windows 8 for 32-bit desktop tools
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2012 and Active Directory 2012
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 10 (for Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows Server 2008)
  • Microsoft Office 2013
  • Microsoft SQL Server 2012 (as both data source and CMS/Audit DB)

Download the Product Availability Matrix (PAM)

Update History
  • September 4, 2014 – Added link to Microsoft Windows lifecycle fact sheet
  • June 4, 2013 – Added information about BI 4.1 RTC, which was released into ramp-up on May 10, 2013
  • May 2, 2013 – Added information about BI 4.0 SP6, which was released on April 30, 2013
  • February 26, 2013 –  Added information about XI 3.1 SP6, which was released on Valentine’s Day, February 14, 2013

What are your organization’s plans for Microsoft Windows 8 and SAP BusinessObjects?

First Impressions of Microsoft Windows 8

I just don’t “get” Microsoft Windows 8.

Last October, I rushed out to the Castleton Best Buy in Indianapolis during Windows 8 launch weekend to snag a copy of Microsoft Windows 8 Professional.  My experience confirms the troubles that both Best Buy and Microsoft are having.

The Purchase

I walked directly to the computer department and was greeted by a pleasant Best Buy employee who looked dazed and confused when I asked about Windows 8.  He walked me over to the software department, where there was a large display of empty Windows 8 boxes. Still puzzled, he asked several of his coworkers where the Windows 8 software was located. After several minutes of confusion, they told me to go to the customer service desk, where the real Windows 8 software boxes were locked into “the cage”. Although all of the Best Buy staff were friendly and the initial employee stayed with me until I found what I needed, I found it curious that they apparently did not have any kind of team meeting in anticipation of the Windows 8 launch.

The Installation

When I got the software home, I found the installation process to be quick and painless on my one-year-old Dell Inspiron N5010, an inexpensive Intel Core i3 laptop that I upgraded to 8 GB RAM. I opted to keep all of my existing applications, although I may yet do a total reinstall to clear up some ongoing DLL issues left over from Windows 7.

Installing Windows 8

Mission accomplished!

IMG_3949

 

The Windows 8 Experience

I must say that after a few months of casual use, I’m still confused by Windows 8.  I just don’t get it. My Dell Inspiron N5010 does not have a touchscreen, but I doubt that having one would change my perceptions. Although a Core i3 hardly qualifies as a workhorse, I’m very disappointed by the overall system performance compared to Windows 7. And I’m disappointed by leading technology columnists like Walt Mossberg making excuses if you’re PC is over a year old (see his Wall Street Journal article, Windows 8: Not for Old-at-Heart PCs). It seems that the mainstream technology press is going out of its way to say nice things about Windows 8 and reluctant to offend anyone at Microsoft. Apple would be crucified if they shipped a MacOS that didn’t work well on “older” Macs.

Brian Boyko, a professional writer & corporate filmmaker, has created a 24-minute video about Microsoft Windows 8 that’s worth your time. His core theme is “Windows 8 is unusable” and he reviews the new operating system with humor and a few naughty words. He analyzes the Windows 8 using four key user interface themes of control, conveyance, continuity and context.

[ youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTYet-qf1jo ]

Jean-Louis Gassée asks an insightful question on Monday Note (see Apple Can Finish What Microsoft’s Sinofsky Started).

Was it Ballmer’s idea or Sinofsky’s?

After being quite impressed with Windows 7, I can’t help but think that Windows 8 is the son of Microsoft Vista. I predict that we’ll see a Windows 8.5 or Windows 9 released later in 2013 that attempts to perform damage control. Before Apple pulls John Hodgman and Justin Long out of retirement.

UPDATE: There will be no Windows 8.5 or Windows 9 but instead Windows 10 will be released sometime in 2015.

Want another perspective? Read SAP Mentor Derek Loranca’s article, Windows 8 Impressions… and why I went back to Windows 7.

UPDATE (10/03/2014): Updated with Windows 10, the version of Windows that will follow Windows 8.1.

What are your thoughts about Microsoft Windows 8?

I Can Live Without Apple’s Latest Glass Rectangle

Sure you can buy the latest Apple gadget. But you don’t have to.

As a “fanboy” who’s doing just fine with a 3-year-old 2009 iPhone 3GS, late-2010 Mac Mini, and 2011 iPad 2, this recent article about planned obsolescence by New York Times technology writer Nick Bilton really bothered me.

It’s part of a strategy that Apple has perfected. How else can the company persuade people to replace their perfectly fine iPhone, iPad, iMac and iEverything else year after year?

From Disruptions: You Know You Can’t Live Without Apple’s Latest Glass Rectangle

It’s true that Apple (and “other vendors”, but hey, let’s rag on Apple because it gets more page views) create sexy new products each year that make the old ones look obsolete.  But I’ve purchased Apple products knowing that they will have a long and productive life, not just a 12-month lifespan until the next model is released.  Not only will these products be supported by Apple, they’ll be upgraded as well.

My late-2010 Mac Mini is running Mountain Lion 10.8, the latest version of Apple’s Mac OS X operating system.  In contrast, the $500 Dell i3 laptop that I purchased last year barely ran Windows 7 well and is now struggling to run Windows 8 (see related article First Impressions of Microsoft Windows 8).  But PC’s are cheap and Macs are overpriced, right?

My 3-year-old iPhone 3GS and 2-year-old iPad 2 are both running the latest iOS 6.  In contrast, many Android tablets and phones neither ship with the latest Android OS or ever get upgraded to it.  And the iPad 2 is so great, Apple continues to sell it even though it recently discontinued the 3rd generation iPad in favor of a much better 4th generation model.

And while PC vendors are shamelessly copying most of Apple’s designs, nobody is copying the great Mac Mini.  Yesterday, I took a quick stroll down the desktop PC aisle at Best Buy (where I purchased my Windows 8 Pro upgrade). There’s nothing but over-sized yet underpowered traditional PC enclosures. Sorry, Nick, the Cadillac fins are stuck on PCs, not Macs.

This year, I’ll be replacing my iPhone 3GS with an iPhone 5. My 3GS runs iOS 6 surprisingly well, but the battery on my beloved 3-year-old phone is toast. Eventually, I will also want to replace my Mac and my iPad with newer models. But I’ll be handing them down to my children, not to the local recycling center.  Which is a different fate than Nick Bilton’s article will have.